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Logo bar of the Alaska Public Lands Information Centers which are located in Anchorage, Fairbanks, Tok and Ketchikan
A young park visitor marvels at a dark dragonfly perched upon an outstretched finger.
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Wildlife by regions in Alaska
 
A young bear playfully rolls
Steve Hillebrand
Alaska affords wonderful wildlife viewing opportunities.

Alaska offers all sorts of opportunities to view unique animals in their native environments. Here you will find what animals can be found in which region of Alaska.

Follow this link for information on viewing Bears in Alaska.

Follow this link for information on viewing Birds in Alaska.

To help reduce the occurrence of undesirable human/wildlife interactions, it is important to keep wildlife in Alaska wild. 

If your presence alters an animal's behavior, you are too close, and should back away immediately.

For more information on viewing wildlife in Alaska visit our Wildlife Etiquette page.



Animals found in the Arctic Regions of Alaska
Animals found in the Interior Region of Alaska
Wildlife in Southcentral Region
Wildlife in the Aleutian Island Region
wildlife found in Southeast Region of Alaska


Click to download the APLIC bear safety in Alaska brochure.
Bear Safety
How to stay safe when traveling in bear country.
more...
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Traveling in Moose Country
Learn tips to stay safe in moose country.
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a brown bear looking glum
Understanding bears.
There are a few things you should know before a bear encounter.
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Shorebirds taking flight in Cordova, Alaska
Bird Festivals
Bird festivals can be found throughout Alaska during all seasons of the year.
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closeup of daisy the porcupine stepping out of her carrier.
Alaska Zoo Programs
Thursday is zoo day at the Alaska Center in Anchorage
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A map shows the migration route of humans traveling from Asia to the Americas by way of the Bering land bridge. The two continents were once connected and are referred to by historians as Beringia. Did You Know?
During the late Wisconsinan glaciation, so much of Earth's water was locked up in huge ice masses that the sea level fell 280 to 350 feet below today's level. This exposed an area up to 1,000 miles wide that stretched between Siberia and Alaska, called Beringia, allowing humans to cross from Asia.