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Invasive Species of Alaska
 
An invasive species, called the Gypsy Moth.
ADF&G
Female Gypsy Moth

What are Invasive Species?

Presidential Executive Order 13112, defines an invasive species as a species: 1) that is nonnative to the ecosystem under consideration, and 2) whose introduction causes or is likely to cause economic or environmental harm or harm to human health.

Invasive species can be an animal, a plant, an insect, or any other living thing that is able to pervade a region because of insufficient checks such as natural predators or diseases.

How are Invasive Species Introduced?

Most invasive species are introduced to a new region through human activity. Some are intentional actions, such as agricultural crops, landscaping and ornamental plants, released or abandoned pets, and bait fish.

Other invasive species arrive through unsuspecting human carriers. They hitchhike on visitors’ clothes, luggage, or transport. Boaters move invasive species that have attached to their equipment or clothing to new bodies of water. Hikers and hunters move invasive species around through mud on boots and other equipment. Drivers move invasive species that catch in their wheel wells, tires, or grills.



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NPS

What can WE do to help protect Alaska?

Obey the Laws

Use Local Products

Become an Invasivore

Learn the Local Species

Report Immediately



A big fish in a white 5 gallon bucket just about to fall into a lake.
ADF&G
A northern pike being illegally released into non-native waters.

Obey the Laws

Laws are not intended to be an inconvenience. Instead, they protect the natural ecosystem. They prevent introducing of invasive species into our environments as well as keeping our species from endangering others. Check with the appropriate agencies for local laws. Declare all plants and animals at appropriate customs checks. http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm?adfg=invasive.regulations

Use Local Products

Items carried in for hikes and camping may also carry pests. Purchase fruits, vegetables, and firewood from the immediate region. Firewood should only be used within a 50 mile radius of its source.

Become an Invasivore

Invasive species are a good source of food, unprotected by local laws. Having a nice dinner of invasive dandelion green salad and northern pike fillets helps contain non-native species in Mat-Su Valley, Anchorage, and the Kenai Peninsula.

Clean Gear

Cleaning gear after use prevents the spreading of invasive species. Hiking boots, waders, boats and trailers, off-road vehicles, and even luggage should be wiped off at a minimum. Not only does this protect our environment, but it also extends the serviceability of the gear.

Learn the Local Species

Knowing what is supposed to be there helps identify that which does not belong.

Report Immediately

Note the location. GPS coordinates and photographs will help officials respond quicker to the threat. Email reports to the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Invasive Species Program or phone the Invasive Species Hotline at 1-877-INVASIV (1-877-468-2748).

For additional information visit:

http://www.alaskasealife.org/New/research/index.php?page=mis_links.php



Dalton Discoveries: Uninvited Guests


Note: This Embedded video resides on the official Alaska Public Lands Information Center YouTube channel
Published on Apr 25, 2014
In 2004 the BLM discovered white sweet clover, an invasive species, was pushing out native plant life along the Dalton Highway. While non-native plants are often found along highway corridors throughout Alaska, this plant has also made its way along some of the waterways that branch off from the highway.



 
Close up image of the striated and curving rock layers of Calico Bluff. Did You Know?
Millions of years old bedrock and stratification are exposed all along the Yukon River in Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve, both in massive cliff faces and bedrock elevated above the surface of the river.
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