largestlargernormal
Logo bar of the Alaska Public Lands Information Center which are located in Anchorage, Fairbanks, Tok and Ketchikan
Two Caribou moving over brown tundra. Blotches of snow are present.
text size
Printer Friendly
Tok Alaska Center
 


The Tok, Alaska Public Lands Information Center is a year-round facility welcoming nearly 10,000 visitors, residents, and students annually. Located in the Tok Combined Facility, the center hosts a trip planning area, fish, bear and bird exhibits, along with a display of native arts and crafts.

This center specifically caters to visitors driving in remote eastern Alaska and into the Yukon.

One of the subjects people are most interested in are the local driving conditions; specifically, the infamous frost heaves located to the east of Tok. The video to the right will shed some light on how those nasty frost heaves form and why they are so prolific in this region of the state.
View more on the official Alaska Department of Transportation Youtube Channel


Tok, Alaska Public Lands Information Center on a sunny summer day. The building is a rustic wooden structure with many potted flowers out front.

The Tok Visitor Center is the gateway to many extensive public lands and scenic rivers. Stop in for local destination information, as well as maps, brochures, and know-how about the rest of Alaska.

 

If you're driving into Alaska from the Yukon. The Alaska Public Lands Information Center in Tok is a must see.

 

Are you a birder? Check out the Annual Upper Tanana Migratory Bird Festival.





 
A brown, irregularly shaped volcanic mountain  rises above a valley. The sky is blue with few clouds. Did You Know?
In 1912, one of the most violent eruptions ever recorded occurred in the wilderness of Katmai National Park & Preserve. The blast collapsed 7,500 foot Mount Katmai to its present elevation of 6,716 feet. In the resulting Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, fumaroles issued steam hot enough to melt zinc.