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Logo bar of the Alaska Public Lands Information Center which are located in Anchorage, Fairbanks, Tok and Ketchikan
Close up image of a grizzly bear cub, with wet, spiky fur, peeking over a line of green brush.
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Katmai National Park and Preserve
 
Homepage for Katmai National Park and Preserve Photo by Pam Link. Katmai National Park. Aug 22, 2009. Katmai National Park Photo by Mark Stevens. Katmai National Park. July 3, 2012

Katmai - The Ends of the Earth Trailer


Note: This Embedded video resides on the official PBS video

A profile shot of a small white float plane as it skims the water just prior to landing on a river in King Salmon. Thick trees are in the background.
Kent Miller
Access to King Salmon is via airplane.

 Plan Your Trip to Katmai National Park

The National Park Service Katmai page has everything you need to know about planning your trip to Katmai. On their site you'll find info about how to get to Katmai, The hours of operation, and various brochures that will help you with the planning process. In addition to planning info, the site has a few helpful things that you will want to know such as bear safety, how to get around in the park, and the laws and policies of the park.

Enjoy Photographs of Katmai National Park and Preserve on their official Flickr account.



Profile shot of three large brown bears standing just on the edge of a waterfall, looking intently at the water, hoping to catch a salmon.
Katmai National Park
Many visitors to Alaska dream of this scene; 3 brown bears fishing at Brooks Falls.

 Information about the McNeil River Game Sanctuary

Among the rugged terrain of Katmai national park lies the McNeil river state game sanctuary and refuge. The river was derived from glaciers and alpine lakes that are located high in the mountains of the aleutian range. The McNeil river provides the livelihood for many animals, which leads to a large population of brown bears. The sanctuary was established in 1967 to protect this populous congregation of brown bears. At the river there can be as many as 144 brown bears viewed in one summer. In addition to the rich population of brown bears, there's also many other animals such as red foxes, arctic ground squirrels, moose, caribou, wolves, wolverines, many mammals, water fowl, sea ducks and seabirds. Permits are required for entry to the sanctuary. Applications for an access permit are available at the Alaska Department of Fish & Game web site.



Three small wooden cabins with yellow benches out front and small, grassy lawns, line a gravel path. Large leafy trees are in the background.
NPS
Cabins are available for rent in Katmai National Park and Preserve.

 Where can I stay in Katmai?

Katmailand is the only registered concessionaire within the park. With Katmailand, you have the option of staying at either the Brooks Lodge, or the Grosvenor Lodge. Both lodges offer over night accommodations, food services, and guide and transportation services. Lodging at Brooks camp is available from June 1st to September 17th and reservations are required. Reservations can be made at the Katmailand website or you can call them at 1-800-544-0551. Several other Lodges around the boundaries of Katmai also offer tour packages within the park. You also have the choice of staying in communities that surround the park such as King Salmon, Naknek, Homer, and Kodiak. Brooks Camp Campground is located 1/4 of a mile from the lodge, and can be reserved through www.recreation.gov or by calling 877-444-6777in U.S. 518-885-3639 International.



A young female National Park Ranger smiles at the camera while leaning on an interpretive display about salmon. A typical visitor center bookstore is in the background.
Kent Miller
Rangers at the Katmai National Park and Preserve visitors center are always happy to help visitors learn about the park's flora and fauna.

 General Information About Katmai

Katmai was established as a National Monument in 1918 to preserve 'The Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes'. But, in 1980 Katmai became a National Park and Preserve of 4,021,327 acres. The Park is still famous for their volcanos, but also for brown bears, beautiful water ways that are loaded with fish, breath taking wilderness, and a rugged coastline. Katmai is home to the Brooks Falls which has the largest concentration of brown bears in the entire world with a count 2,000 bears. There are many recreational opportunities within the park such as hiking, kayaking, and canoeing.  





 
Close up view of three Muskox huddled together facing the camera. The nose of a smaller foueth muskox peeks out between the two animals on the right. Muskox are large, brown furry bison-like animals with patches of white fur on the top of their heads and low curved horns. Did You Know?
Standing four feet tall at the shoulder, muskox are essentially unchanged since the last ice age, 10,000 years ago. They have sixteen inch long guard hairs that insulate them against the cold and their undercoat, called quiviut (kiv-yoot), can be knitted to make hats and scarves.
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