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Logo bar of the Alaska Public Lands Information Center which are located in Anchorage, Fairbanks, Tok and Ketchikan
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Alaska Geographic
 
A polar bear and raven are intertwined on the logo of Alaska Geographic.

The Anchorage, Fairbanks, and Ketchikan centers have on-site book stores run by a cooperative partner, Alaska Geographic. Each of the stores carries books, maps, and other materials about Alaska's public lands with a focus on those unique to that region. Every purchase you make directly benefits Alaska's parks, forests, and refuges - a portion of each sale supports educational and interpretive programs throughout Alaska's public lands.

Look to Alaska Geographic for the most comprehensive selection of books, maps, and films about the Alaska and its public lands. As the park’s official nonprofit education partner and bookstore, Alaska Geographic offers an extensive collection of titles on the area’s natural and cultural heritage, provides financial support for interpretive programs and other educational offerings, and works to connect visitors with Alaska’s magnificent wildlands.

Alaska Geographic members receive exclusive benefits, including discounts online and at Alaska Geographic bookstores statewide. To find out more, become a member, or browse the online bookstore, visit http://www.alaskageographic.org (or click the logo above).



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Central Office:
Alaska Geographic
810 East Ninth Avenue
Anchorage, AK 99501
907-274-8440
Or toll free at
866-AK-PARKS

Fairbanks:
Alaska Geographic
Morris Thompson Cultural and Visitors Center
101 Dunkel Street
Fairbanks, AK 99701
907-459-3710 or 907-459-3730
Tues-Sat Noon-4pm

Ketchikan:
Southeast Alaska Discovery Center
50 Main Street
Ketchikan, AK 99901
(907) 228-6220
Anchorage:
Alaska Public Lands Information Center
605 West 4th Ave, Suite 105
Anchorage, AK 99501
(907) 644-3661

 





 
A group of people dressed in heavy winter gear stand behind a team of eight dogs attached to a dog sled. The landscape is pristine and white with craggy mountains in the distance. Did You Know?
Archaeological evidence suggests the Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge was part of the route traveled by Siberian hunters from Asia to America over 10,000 years ago. The resident Alaskan Gwich'in and Koyukon Athabascan Natives are related to the Apache and Navajo tribes of the Southwest.